Solar Eclipse Experience from Vancouver with Alison Price – August 21, 2017

by Alison Price

My Eclipse Timeline

9:00am

I left home and made my way to the Vancouver Art Gallery plaza and Robson Square in the heart of Vancouver.

I found a spot on the steps high up where the early birds had gathered. You know those eclipse watchers that were there before me.

 

9:10am

With my super eclipse shades, I began to watch the eclipse and the Moon’s limb slowly crept over the disk of the Sun. Very exciting.

The guy next to me was photographing with a very expensive looking camera. Two young students about aged 19 sat down with two plates of bacon, fried eggs, and toast from the food truck nearby. They proceeded to tuck in and wolf the lot down.

9:50am

The Moon’s limb reached the center point of the Sun’s disk easing in from the right.

So far it has been a bright and sunny summer’s day in the city. The sky was blue and virtually cloud-free, so perfect eclipse viewing weather. By now it is still very hot and with a slight breeze.

10:00am

The Moon is now almost two-thirds over the Sun. Is it getting cooler? I believe it may be.

The crowd has grown as more people gather on the steps.

Many are using the pinpoint viewing method of projecting the eclipse onto a card or the back wall.

The excitement was getting palpable.

I tried to take a photo with my eclipse glasses but the shot is a very blurry orange blob. Clearly, I am not a great photographer.

Trying to take a photo through my eclipse shades with my iPhone camera.

 

10:05am

Feeling a bit cooler now. Lots of people on the steps. The excitement is stronger as the conversations flow amongst the strangers who have come together at this special moment in time. Keen eclipse they exchange opinions on the best way to view the eclipse.

Keen eclipse watchers exchange opinions on the best way to view the eclipse.

The orange blurry blob is the eclipse.

10:20am

We are now at maximum coverage for Vancouver at around 78%. It seems strange how the Moon is moving from the right to the left. Now it is as total as it gets and it is definitely cooler now. The crowd is at full capacity on the steps now.

At the maximum the Moon seems to be moving off towards the bottom of the Sun as the thin crescent of the Sun still glares through the light is still strong but not the heat. The shadows seem even longer but how can that be?

At the moment of maximum, the crowd cheers and yells and everyone is smiling. What a super community here in Vancouver.

I am so happy I chose this spot to view the eclipse. The Sun now look orange and nearly red through my super cool shades.

People start to share their viewing screens and some let the flood of lawyers from the courts nearby to see. I cannot tell you the community support and camaraderie here on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery Plaza.

This is truly a special place to live. I am grateful that my husband brought us here over five years ago.

What teh Sun looks like at greatest eclipse. Still lots of light but a little cooler.

 

The last solar eclipse I saw was in Phalaborwa on the Tropic of Capricorn at latitude 23S in the southern hemisphere. This solar eclipse is being watched on the forty-ninth parallel at latitude 49N on the Pacific West Coast of Canada.

Where will I see my next solar eclipse? Who knows but I will look in Solar Fire and find one close by or one that I can comfortably travel to.

My notes that were taken on location in Vancouver.

I’ll definitely see you the next eclipse and I may even have special Starzology eclipse shades for you as well in my favourite cantaloupe colour.


 

 

Eclipse Fever – Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017

by Alison Price

Solar Eclipse

On August 21st, 2017 there will be a solar eclipse visible from many places in the North America.

The eclipse will pass through the US from Oregon to South Carolina with the shadow of the Moon streaking across the land with the total eclipse path around 65km wide.

Even up here in Vancouver, Canada we see the Moon cover around 75% of the disc of the Sun and it will be a partial eclipse for us.

I have cleared my diary for this special day and I shall be in the park across from my apartment at the time of the eclipse which will reach totality at around 10:30 am.

You need to have found a seat by 9 am. I plan to take a coffee and a brunch picnic.

Perhaps I’ll have my sketchbook as well.

You will need special eclipse glasses and I have mine already.

I first used these for the Venus transit of the Sun way back in 2012 so they’ve been lying on my shelf waiting for another solar eclipse to come my way.

The Eclipse Path

Even though there are at least two solar Eclipses each year they often pass unnoticed over the ocean so you don’t get to see them at all. But this August the world will be watching as the shadow sweeps over the USA from Oregon to South Carolina.

Check out this handy eclipse path diagram with the compliments of NASA.

You Interpret Eclipses in 3 ways

  • The Eclipse Chart Itself – General
  • How it Contacts your Birth Chart – Personal
  • The Original Saros Chart – Collective

1 – The Eclipse Chart – General Interpretation

The actual eclipse chart itself will show you the nature of this particular eclipse. Always set your eclipse chart for the zero Aries house system if you are interpreting the eclipse itself.

Now aspects to the eclipse will come into play and with any eclipse chart you can look at:

  • Any planet conjoined this solar eclipse as it will be important.
  • Any planets opposing the solar eclipse will be important.
  • Any other aspects to the eclipse point can now be considered.

     


    2 – Contacts to your Natal chart – Personal Interpretation

When looking at the personal effect of any particular eclipse check for two main things regarding your natal chart; the house and the aspects.

Natal House

The eclipse will be at 28 Leo. Find which house in your chart the eclipse will fall and this will be where you can make a new start.

Eclipse Aspects to Your Natal Chart

For aspects use an orb of 2 degrees and see if this eclipse contacts any of your planets or points with either an opposition or a conjunction.

I don’t look at other aspects as the main feature of any eclipse is the syzygy between the Sun, Moon and the Earth.

To support this geometry you only need to consider conjunctions (solar eclipse) and opposition (lunar eclipse). Only these two aspects are of interest when working with an eclipse to your natal chart.

If there are no conjunctions or oppositions to your natal chart this particular eclipse will probably not affect you much.

Conjunctions to you own Sun will make this eclipse a part of your Solar Return chart and thus it will be in effect for one whole year for you.

If your birthday is from August 19th to 23rd of any year the energy in this eclipse will affect you for the next twelve months.


3 – The Original Saros Chart – Collective Interpretation

Every eclipse belongs to a Saros series. The original Saros chart from the first eclipse in the Saros is important to show the nature of this family of eclipses.

The original Saros chart for the eclipse on August 21st, Saros series 1 North is shown below.

Solar Eclipse Saros 1 N 3 January 1639

 

Saros 145

Below is the full display of Saros 145. The blue line is the Moon’s shadow as it slowly draws down towards the south with every eclipse in the Saros.


How Long Does an Eclipse Effect Last?

Typically astrologers say an eclipse will last until the next eclipses season or about six months when it is then wiped out by the current eclipses.

But there is a better way to measure the length of time each particular eclipse will last.

Solar Eclipse Effects in Time

Solar eclipses are in effect for one month for each minute of the eclipse. This particular eclipse is total for 2 minutes and 40 seconds so its effect will be for around two and a half months.

Lunar Eclipse Effects in Time

Note: Lunar eclipses are in effect for one day for each minute the eclipse lasts